Top 10 Myths About Jewellery Dispelled

| 4 min read

Many gemstones have rich and fascinating histories that stretch back hundreds, even thousands, of years so it's really no surprise that over time many myths have built up around these stones. We'd like to do our bit to dispel these false nuggets of information so here are our top 10 jewellery myths that we hear time and time again that are simply not true.

Diamond myths

"DIAMONDS ARE INDESTRUCTIBLE"

Diamonds are measured at 10 on the Mohs hardness scale and can only be scratched by another Diamond. However, they aren't that tough. Due to atomic planes of relative weakness known as 'cleavage planes', they can chip or crack should they obtain a blow of sufficient force in an exact direction.

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Paraiba Tourmaline myths

"PARAIBA TOURMALINE ONLY COMES FROM PARAIBA, BRAZIL"

Although first found in Paraiba, Brazil, these beautiful Tourmalines are now mined in regions of Africa, such as Nigeria and Mozambique. A global association of jewellers determined that the term 'Paraiba' can be used to describe the colour of the stone, not just its provenance.

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Gold myths

"YOU CAN TELL IF A PIECE OF GOLD IS REAL BY BITING IT"

This is somewhat true, in the sense that when you bite gold it will leave an imprint; the purer the gold, the softer it will be. However, unscrupulous people have been known to paint lead with gold, making a lookalike that is just as soft.

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Gold colour myths

"GOLD COMES IN VARIOUS COLOURS"

Gold colours are referred to as white, yellow, rose and sometimes even pink, however, the only true gold is yellow. Coloured gold is actually a mixed metal compound called an alloy, made by mixing pure gold with iron, silver, platinum, copper or aluminium creating the various colours. In fact all yellow gold, apart from 24 carat gold, is also alloy since it is mixed with other metals.

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Opal myths

"OPALS BRING BAD LUCK"

This myth is based on old folklore. There are many people who actually connect Opals with good luck. The Romans believed Opal brought good luck to their owners and Australian Aboriginals called it the 'rainbow serpent' and praised its unique energy and beauty.

See our delightful range of Opal jewellery here

Diamond size myths

"BIGGER DIAMONDS ARE BETTER DIAMONDS"

The truth is that it's actually the quality of the Diamond that makes it better. Factors such as colour, clarity, cut quality, shape and light return are all considerations, rather than just size alone. The brilliance and fire of a beautifully cut, small Diamond of good quality will always be better than a large, badly cut, dull Diamond.

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Diamond rarity myths

"DIAMOND IS THE RAREST GEMSTONE IN THE WORLD"

Although large, high-quality Diamonds are rare, Diamonds are actually comparatively common. Among the contenders for rarest gemstones are Grandidierite, Csarite®, Painite, Alexandrite, Benitoite, Red Beryl and Taaffeite.

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Pearl origin myths

"ALL PEARLS COME FROM OYSTERS"

Although the majority of gem-quality Pearls come from oysters or mussels, there are other species that produce Pearls. The Melo Melo marine snail produces an orange-brown Pearl. The queen conch Strombus Gigas creates the Pink Conch Pearl and the blue-purple-green iridescent Abalone Pearl comes from the Haliotis Iris mollusc.

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Sapphire myths

"ALL SAPPHIRES ARE BLUE"

A Sapphire can be blue, but it can also be yellow, orange, pink or green. Rubies are actually just red Sapphires as they both come from the same mineral compound, called corundum. There is some disagreement in the gemstone industry about where Pink Sapphires end and Rubies begin.

Browse all the colours of Sapphire here

Pearl myths

"PEARLS CAN BE DISSOLVED IN VINEGAR"

Legend says that Cleopatra dissolved a valuable Pearl in vinegar and drank it to show off her wealth to Mark Antony. This is highly unlikely. Pearls are made of calcium carbonate which can dissolve in vinegar, but it would take an extremely long time.

Have a look at our wonderful collection of Pearl necklaces

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